Prevention of Dementia

A broader approach to risk reduction and prevention of dementia, including promoting resilience, is crucial for the future of our ageing societies.
Any future disease-modifying treatment for dementia will not remove the need for its effective prevention.
Modifying several risk factors simultaneously early on in a person’s lifespan could translate into a large effect on the global burden of dementia, which would  have huge implications for social and health-care costs.

Prevention of Dementia

A broader approach to risk reduction and prevention of dementia, including promoting resilience, is crucial for the future of our ageing societies. Any future disease-modifying treatment for dementia will not remove the need for its effective prevention.
Modifying several risk factors simultaneously early on in a person’s lifespan could translate into a large effect on the global burden of dementia, which would have huge implications for social and health-care costs.

Exercise & physical activity

Individuals who are physically active throughout life are more likely to maintain good cognition than those who are inactive. For older adults especially, regular physical exercise is related to less cognitive decline.
Good choices are aerobic physical activities as well as muscle-strength and balance exercises.

Exercise & physical activity

Individuals who are physically active throughout life are more likely to maintain good cognition than those who  are inactive. For older adults especially, regular physical exercise is related to less cognitive decline. Good choices are aerobic physical activities as well as muscle-strength and balance exercises.

Cardiovascular risk factors

 

Controlling cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, obesity and elevated blood glucose is important for prevention of dementia already in midlife. Particularly active treatment of hypertension is recommended to reduce incidence of cognitive impairment in both middle aged (45–65 years) and older people (aged older than 65 years) without dementia. In addition to medical treatment, physical activity and healthy diet help in reducing these risk factors.

Cardiovascular risk factors

Controlling cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, obesity and elevated blood glucose is important for prevention of dementia already in midlife. Particularly active treatment of hypertension is recommended to reduce incidence of cognitive impairment in both middle aged (45–65 years) and older people (aged older than 65 years) without dementia. In addition to medical treatment, physical activity and healthy diet help in reducing these risk factors.

Social interaction

Social interaction and social contacts are important stimulants for cognition.  There is growing evidence  that social isolation is a risk factor for dementia, which highlights the importance of considering the social engagement of older people and not only their physical and mental health. However, sometimes social isolation might be a prodrome or a part of the dementia syndrome, so early intervention is important.

Social interaction

Social interaction and social contacts are important stimulants for cognition.  There is growing evidence  that social isolation is a risk factor for dementia, which highlights the importance of considering the social engagement of older people and not only their physical and mental health. However, sometimes social isolation might be a prodrome or a part of the dementia syndrome, so early intervention is important.

Nutrition

A healthy diet is key for the prevention of many chronic diseases. Individuals who adhere to a Mediterranean diet or other healthy dietary patterns characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables, whole grain and fish, and low intake of red meat are less likely to have cognitive impairment.
A healthy diet also prevents vascular disease and, thus, diet can affect brain health by lowering a number of different risk factors.

Nutrition

A healthy diet is key for the prevention of many chronic diseases. Individuals who adhere to a Mediterranean diet or other healthy dietary patterns characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables, whole grain and fish, and low intake of red meat are less likely to have cognitive impairment. A healthy diet also prevents vascular disease and, thus, diet can affect brain health by lowering a number of different risk factors.

Smoking and alcohol

Smoking contributes to many dementia-related risk factors, and quitting smoking reduces the risk for dementia. Moderate amounts of alcohol are not harmful for brain health, but alcohol consumption should be as low as possible, particularly in older age. High-level alcohol consumption increases the risk for dementia.

Smoking and alcohol

Smoking contributes to many dementia-related risk factors, and quitting smoking reduces the risk for dementia. Moderate amounts of alcohol are not harmful for brain health, but alcohol consumption should be as low as possible, particularly in older age. High-level alcohol consumption increases the risk for dementia.

Cognitive training

Epidemiological studies show initial evidence that engaging in cognitively stimulating activities might benefit cognition and reduce dementia risk, suggesting that cognitive reserve is not a static property. Ongoing education and engaging in cognitively stimulating activities might continue to increase cognitive reserve and, thus, improve cognitive performance.

Cognitive training

Epidemiological studies show initial evidence that engaging in cognitively stimulating activities might benefit cognition and reduce dementia risk, suggesting that cognitive reserve is not a static property. Ongoing education and engaging in cognitively stimulating activities might continue to increase cognitive reserve and, thus, improve cognitive performance.

Sleep quality, meditation and relaxation

Sleep disorders have received some attention for their role in the development of cognitive impairment. Sleep might promote repair of damage caused by other factors, but studies are still ongoing.

Sleep quality, meditation and relaxation


Sleep disorders have received some attention for their role in the development of cognitive impairment. Sleep might promote repair of damage caused by other factors, but studies are still ongoing.

Consortium

 

The LETHE-Project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 101017405

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/policies/ehealth

Coordination

Contact

Sten Hanke
Project Coordinator
info@lethe-project.eu
+43 664 825 1358

 

 

Follow Us

Consortium

 

The LETHE-Project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 101017405

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/policies/ehealth

Coordination

Contact

Sten Hanke
Project Coordinator
info@lethe-project.eu
+43 664 825 1358

 

 

Follow Us

Skip to content